Raised IL-6 Levels: A Risk Factor for Cardiovascular Associated Complications in HIV Positive Zambians Presenting at the University Teaching Hospital before Initiation of Antiretroviral Therapy (ART)

  • Panji Nhhoma 1University of Zambia, School of Medicine, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Lusaka, Zambia
  • T Kaile 2University of Zambia, School of Medicine, Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Lusaka, Zambia
  • G Kwenda 1University of Zambia, School of Medicine, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Lusaka, Zambia
  • M Sinkala 1University of Zambia, School of Medicine, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Lusaka, Zambia
  • F Mwaba 2University of Zambia, School of Medicine, Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Lusaka, Zambia
  • H Mantina 3University Teaching Hospital, Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Lusaka, Zambia
Keywords: CD4, HIV, Interleukin-6

Abstract

Objectives - The objectives of the study were to compare plasma levels of IL-6 in HIV positive and HIV negative individuals and to correlate them with CD4 count

Materials and methods - A cross-sectional study was carried out at the University Teaching Hospital in Lusaka, Zambia. IL-6 and CD4 were assessed in HIV positive on ART, HIV positive ART- naïve and HIV negative control participants.

Results and Conclusion - Our study showed that HIV ART naïve participants had higher IL-6 concentrations (2.83 ± 1.60 ng/ml)  than those on ART (2.49 ± 1.21 ng/ml) p = 0.020. HIV negative control participants however, had higher concentrations of IL-6 (3.24 ± 1.33 ng/ml) than HIV positive participants on ART (2.49 ± 1.21) p = 0.002. HIV positive ART naïve individuals therefore, had the highest IL-6 levels. The results also showed that ART lowers inflammation in HIV and this may explain why ART reduces the risk of developing opportunistic tumours and other infections in HIV.

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Published
2017-06-09
Section
Articles